Role of 5G in Medical Health: First Test Case

Norway’s first private individual, who works in the Emergency Medical Center (AMK) Inland, to connect to a 5G mobile network. He knows that good coverage can mean life or death.This is Europe’s first use case of 5g applications in healthcare.

He has truly experienced the importance of a functioning 5G mobile network.He has tried everything a mobile can do and clearly notices the difference from LTE mobile network.

“I notice that there is better sound and much faster network. Whether I’m streaming movies or sending video clips.”

As per him every day we notice how important it is to have a proper network, when there are people who need help and need to notify.With a functioning 5G network you can send ECG measurements of patients to HQ hospitals faster, you can film car wrecks to get an impression of the extent of damage after a traffic accident.
And it can be easier to find people who have lost their way in the mountains, he said.

This is just a start of evolution of 5G in internet of medical things (IoMT).

This is 5G

The hyper-connected community of revolutionary technology on 5G is soon a reality. It means a huge number of things connected to the web, high speeds, minimal delays, increased reliability and brand new possibilities for using the web.

What is 5G?

We have been developing mobile networks with new generations about every ten years since analogue NMT (1G) came in 1981, 2G in 1992, 3G in 2001 and 4G in 2010. Around 2020 comes 5G.

5G will provide us with two main types of communication solutions: The first provides us with a higher capacity mobile broadband network and enhanced user experiences. The second major type provides a 5G network that will enable special networking solutions for many different purposes with different functionality requirements. It will be designed for billions of things connected to the web, for very fast response times, and for increased security and reliability.

The big difference between the 5G network and previous generations is that 5G is designed to provide networks and services to various industrial and community-driven equipment units, as well as services and networks for the smartphone.

How would you like to experience 5G?

In addition to mobile broadband, 5G will be offered as fixed broadband access to households and businesses in areas without fiber networks. It will also be arranged for broadcasting of radio and TV. The emergency services will have their own safe and effective solutions for emergency situations, including for coordination of communication with audio, video, maps, positioning, first aid, drone management etc. Companies, government agencies and households will be able to create their own “private” networks of sensors and machines that can be controlled and controlled via the network. Vehicles will be connected and combined for safer and more efficient traffic management. In the health sector, 5G could be used for telemedicine to diagnose and treat patients where they are. In the energy sector, 5G can be used to measure and control production, distribution and consumption in more environmentally friendly and cost-effective ways. In the food industry, 5G will enable more efficient and environmentally friendly production and distribution with the use of sensors that monitor and quality assure the entire food chain from sea, field and barge to the dinner table.

5G is expected to be a driver in the digital transformation of the ICT community of the future, for example, with sensor and communication solutions for smart cities, autonomous transport solutions and emergency networks. Individuals will experience new and improved digital services on their smartphone delivered over 5G. These services will be much faster, more accessible and more secure than today’s services. Individuals will also benefit from sensor and communication solutions for smart cities, autonomous transport solutions and emergency networks. Other 5G services will utilize the available speed and enhanced security for the transmission of virtual or customized reality, such as to “ambulance hospitals” or “firefighter support systems”.

When will 5G be available?

From the start, 5G will be gradually built on top of the 4G network. 5G technology is standardized in two phases, in 2018 and 2019 with international approval in 2020/21, but it is difficult to determine when 5G becomes widely available.

5G is under development and piloted in Europe, Asia and the USA starts with pilots for testing among other things. self-driving buses in 2018. During the Olympics in South Korea it was tested, among other things. 360-degree TV services and 5G-based robots. Commercial development is expected to start in 2020 as needed, but it will not be a massive rollout as we have seen for 3G and 4G. In the coming years, international research and innovation within 5G will focus on the evaluation of 5G.

The KPIs (“key performance indicators”) and piloting of solutions for different applications in different industries.

What is unique about 5G?

5G will come with a host of new and unique features, compared to the 4G network we have become. Three important examples of areas that will benefit from 5G, so-called industrial verticals, are autonomous transport solutions, the energy sector and the media industry. One conceivable transport solution may be the interconnection of cars (“platooning”) with communication between the cars and from the cars to the network which require extremely low delay and strong robustness. This will allow cars and traffic signals to be synchronized for optimum driving speed and density of cars in all conditions.

For the energy sector, however, a massive IoT system with large amounts of sensors that constantly provide new information and data for monitoring, control and big data analysis can be critical.

In the media world, consumers may want to have access to a 5G network at extreme speeds, enabling high quality streaming in real time, preferably with an AR experience as well.

In particular, five features of 5G offer great potential for new applications, helping to propel the hyper-connected community and enable much of the revolutionary technology we hear about otherwise:

Ski-divided network

5G enables operation of a more flexible and programmable network. This is possible through the use of new technology for logical or network slices. Various logical networks will be created on top of this extremely flexible infrastructure, and will deliver as different networking infrastructure as the application requires. In practice, this means that it will be experienced as services with very different needs, such as health services, industrial areas and zones for autonomous vehicles, each having their own network, within the same network – tailored to their needs, and without the expense of each other.

Robustness and Quality

Guarantees This disc sharing also offers guaranteed quality of service (QoS) for various industries, services and uses – which is especially important for critical functions (such as health and emergency services, transport and industrial production), and also makes it safer to become more digital. It ensures a robustness in the network, which enables zero-tolerance services for failures, errors and delays, to use Internet-based services and systems in a whole new way.

Extremely low delays

5G will offer much lower delays in the network than before, some estimate down to 1 ms. In a 4G network, the delay is about 25 ms. As mentioned above, this will be especially important for self-driving cars – which can then communicate for both safer and more efficient transport, when a car knows that the car in front brakes in what it does, it is both secured against a potential collision and can Avoid queuing during synchronized movements. In health, too, low delays can be considered essential, for example with the use of remote-controlled robotic surgery – which you do not want to have any delays, but have near perfect response time from machine and patient in one hospital, to the doctor who controls the operation from a another hospital. 5G offers ultra reliability in these delays, uRLLC (ultra Reliable Low Latency Communication),

Massive machine type communication (mMTC)

Possibility of massive volumes of things connected to the network 5G technology will also make it possible to have a large number of things connected to the network, known as massive machine type communication (mMTC).
We already see that most people have a smartphone, but the great growth of connections is sensors, machines and things connected to the internet – the so-called Internet of Things (IoT). These things also have very different needs: some will exchange tiny amounts of data and ensure long battery life (like a parking sensor buried in the tarmac), while others, like a self-driving car, have plenty of power, but will transfer large amounts of data to cloud. In order for all the technology that is now expected to be implemented within the broad IoT concept, one must have a network that can handle such massive volumes of things on the same network. It offers 5G, which enables one million connected things on the same network, per square kilometer.

High speeds

The least radically different from 4G to 5G, but noteworthy, is the evolution in the speed of the network we will be able to offer. This is not only necessary to meet the strong growth in data traffic in the web that we already see, where more and more content requires large amounts of data. An example here is whether more and more people should stream 4K quality video. It also means that completely new uses are emerging. For example, far more advanced functions and operations can be done in the “cloud” because data is transmitted quickly in the network and does not need to be stored or processed locally. This allows mobile devices to become more advanced and do more demanding things than we have been used to. The big speeds will also be a driver for faster development in the so-called augmented reality,

Some of these features may also be fully or partially incorporated into the constantly evolving 4G network (so-called 4.5G). This means that they will be available even where no 5G coverage will be available, but you will still rely on 4G. Therefore, there is a constant development of the 4G network as well, which will help drive the digitization of society. 5G will enable entirely new uses for the technologies we already have, and will be needed to make use of the technologies we expect will come. The practical consequence of this is that if we are going to be able to take advantage of all the opportunities that new technology gives us, we rely on a better digital infrastructure than the one we have today. That’s why 5G is about far more than just creating a new network,

From one G to another

We are now approaching the fifth generation of mobile networks. Evenly, it can be said that there has been a change about every ten years. Why? Because each “G” in a sense experiences an expiration date. Not as a food, which you know is going to be bad – but, rather, we see that technology in society is evolving in a way that the network is unable to keep up with serving. For example, 3G opened for mobile data, but was not adapted to the revolution that led to the iPhone’s entry in 2007 for data traffic and applications for mobile phones. It was 4G as a dedicated computer network, which made the smartphones shine. The shifts are not driven by needs alone, but also by what can be offered. Networking technology is constantly improving. Then new standards are needed.

Thus, for a G is not a single technological solution, but a standard consisting of a number of technologies, which describe how good a network should be and how it should be built – among other things.

The dynamics are so simple: We need more and we can offer more. It’s the same thing that drives the race against 5G.

Amram David

Senior Contributor at DFI Club
Amram is a technical analyst and partner at DFI Club Research, a high-tech research and advisory firm .He has over 10 years of technical and business experience with leading high-tech companies including Huawei,Nokia,Ericsson on ICT, Semiconductor, Microelectronics Systems and embedded systems.Amram focuses on the business critical points where new technologies drive innovations.
Amram David

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